Engineering & Architecture


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Overview
Example classes within this interest area
Example careers
Relevance to Myanmar
What students have said
Undergraduate Majors
Graduate Majors


Overview:

The important thing about every kind of engineering is that it combines a science with a very practical purpose, that’s why it’s called also ‘applied science’. Engineering is the application of scientific or mathematical principles to develop economical solutions to technical problems, creating products, facilities, and structures that are useful to people. Engineers use imagination, judgment, and reasoning to apply science, technology, mathematics, and practical experience. The result is the design, production, and operation of useful objects or processes. The broad discipline of engineering encompasses a range of specialized minor disciplines that focus on the issues associated with developing a specific kind of product, or using a specific type of technology. For every specialization you choose, you should have very strong basis of mathematics, science and computer. Students who are interested in combining an engineering background with computers should consider computer engineering. Chemical engineers apply the basic principles of chemistry, physics, mathematics and related engineering disciplines to the production of goods and materials for society. Electrical engineering is a broad-based and rapidly growing field that includes everything from batteries and power supplies to microchip fabrication to the invention of autonomous robots and devices. A student who chooses to major in bioengineering enters a field where there is much exciting work with cells and laboratory research centering on cell and tissue engineering, biomechanics, neural engineering and rehabilitative engineering. Mechanical engineers are typically involved with the generation, distribution, and use of energy, the processing of materials, the control and automation of manufacturing systems, the design and development of machines, and the solutions to environmental problems. This is only a short list of all the possible specializations of engineering.

Architecture is the art and science of designing buildings and structures. A wider definition would include within its scope also the design of the total built environment, from the macrolevel of town planning, urban design, and landscape architecture to the microlevel of creating furniture. Architectural design usually must address both feasibility and cost for the builder, as well as function and aesthetics for the user. Architects are concerned with nothing less than the form of the physical environment and its effect on people’s lives. Architecture is equal parts art and science, and it encompasses technical, social, aesthetic, and ethical concerns. Those wishing to major in Architecture should have a good knowledge of physics and mathematics.

Engineering and Architecture majors may include the following classes:

  • Physics
  • Design Fundamental
  • Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry
  • Architectural History
  • Construction
  • Principles of Engineering
  • Chemistry
  • Dynamics
  • Cell engineering
  • Thermodynamics
  • Computer Science

Example careers:

  • Architect
  • City Planner
  • Engineer
  • Interior Designer
  • Professor
  • Scientist
  • Researcher

Relevance to Myanmar:

Engineering and architecture cover a broad range of employment opportunities. Engineers could contribute to both the private and public sector development. Currently, the most productive sectors will continue to be in extractive industries, especially oil and gas, mining, and timber, but other areas, such as manufacturing and services, are struggling with inadequate infrastructure. Engineers could work for businesses designing products or manufacturing systems which is an important part of growth for the Myanmar economy, or in the public sector could work towards building a better infrastructure including transport, communication, sanitation, and power generation networks. Engineers could help to increase potential for manufacturing and services which would greatly boost the economic situation.

As the economy becomes less restricted and regulated, there will be growth across many sectors of the economy. As infrastructure has not been properly maintained, many buildings will need to be constructed. Many buildings are old, outdated and unsafe. Architects would be able to both design new structures or help to save or repair old structures. In Rangoon for instance, there are many buildings, but many are in a state of disrepair. Architects would be responsible for designing innovative solutions to preserve the historical structures both for the public and private sectors.

Both engineering and architecture contribute to the standard of living in a country. Many people live in city slums or rural villages without proper sanitation which leads to the spread of disease. By having functional infrastructure pollution can be reduced, sanitation and safety can be increased and greater efficiency achieved. This all leads to a healthier and more successful Myanmar.

Additionally, engineering and architecture are forms of art representing cultural heritage. Most people associate these forms of art with their culture and country. Engineers and architects could contribute to the creation and restoration of Myanmar’s architectural heritage.

What Students Have Said:

Why is the subject you studied (or are studying now) important for Myanmar?

I am studying Architecture. It is an essential program for the future of Myanmar. Architecture is to provide the needs of community physically, as well as psychologically. Good design will produce good function followed by the aesthetics. Myanmar is in need of the facility to develop such as, commercial buildings for economic purposes, residential buildings for the slum areas, as well as for education, health, sport, transportation etc. Good architecture brings a good reputation for the country. We have a very rich of historical heritage in Architecture such as Shwedagon, Bagan, and many other places around the country. We also have our own architectural style and it is the only way to represent our identity. We need to develop Myanmar architecture with the help of technology for the future of Burmese. I want all the citizen say that they are proud to be Burmese. Therefore, the study field architecture is very important for Myanmar.

How have you been able to use your education after you graduated (or how will you in the future)?

I can work as an architect for community development such as designing the residential, commercial, education, public spaces, health, and transportation structures. If I have an opportunity to study master of urban design planning and management program, I will be able to contribute my knowledge as an urban designer and manage the urban architecture considering sustainable development.

What are the real job opportunities to work for Myanmar with your degree?

I am sure that I will become an architect any way. As an architect I can do many things, such as designing building, landscape, event craft and fashion. The real job opportunities will be architect, teacher, designer, town and city planner, urban planner, and municipal authority. I am also interested in traditional products from different ethnicities, which can be combined with the design element, in order to promote and create the local business. Finally, I can establish a firm on my own and produce the architectural products for Myanmar. Those are the possible real job opportunities to work for Myanmar with my degree.

Undergraduate Majors:

Graduate Majors:

Undergraduate Major Descriptions:

Agricultural Engineering

Agricultural/biological engineering and bioengineering are swiftly evolving fields that integrate the principles of biological and physical sciences and use them to solve agricultural and environmental problems. Engineers in these fields design systems and equipment that increase agricultural productivity and food safety. They also manage and conserve soil, water, air, energy, and other agricultural resources. As an agricultural/biological engineering or bioengineering major, you’ll learn the skills of engineering as they relate to agriculture, food production, and resource conservation. For example, as a bioengineer, your interests might lie in working to create a breed of fatter, tastier tomatoes (non-attacking variety) or speeding up the fermentation of grape juice into wine. You’ll take advanced and difficult courses in many different subjects, including math, physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. Laboratory work and computer science will also be big components of your studies

Architecture

Architecture is the art or practice of designing and building structures, especially habitable ones. Architects have a key role in the shaping of our environment. They are involved in design activities that range in scale from city and community design to house and furniture design. They work in with planners, engineers, and graphic designers. They work in large and small offices in both the public and private sector. Architecture majors must possess basic skills in computer operation, computer software, and critical thinking on a variety of social, political, historical, and environmental issues. Architecture majors are often inquisitive, analytical, scientific, observant, they are able to think abstractly, able to solve math problems, able to draw, and understand scientific theories. You should have a strong knowledge of mathematics (algebra, geometry and trigonometry), physics and an interest in art as well.

Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical engineers have saved and improved lives of people around the globe through breakthroughs and innovations that have helped solve problems that have baffled the industry for years. Patients who benefit from an artificial organ or a prosthetic limb, for example, have biomedical engineers to thank. Through your major in biomedical engineering, you’ll learn how to use physics, chemistry, mathematics, and engineering to produce solutions to important biological and medical problems. Topics span from the fundamental studies of biological structures to applied medical device design and evaluation. Many of your investigations will involve the design and development of implantable or indwelling devices such as orthopedic, cardiac, endovascular, drug delivery, or cell- and tissue-engineered systems. As a biomedical engineering major, you’ll also be responsible for understanding laboratory techniques, concepts of engineering design, and the ethics involved when practicing the development of biomedical devices and systems. Through research you’ll see practical applications of the laws of biology and how what you study leads to new advancements in fields far outside the realm of engineering. Many biomedical engineering programs also cover the basics of our healthcare system, meaning you could study health management systems and legal and ethical issues in healthcare. Graduates may find themselves working with pharmaceuticals, medical devices, artificial organs, prosthetics and sensory aids, diagnostics, medical instrumentation, or medical imaging.

Chemical Engineering

Chemical engineers apply the basic principles of chemistry, physics, mathematics and related engineering disciplines to the production of goods and materials for society. Chemical engineers solve a variety of problems involving chemicals. They design equipment and develop processes for chemical manufacturing on small or large scales. A chemical engineering graduate has the capability for serving the needs of industry or government or for pursuing advanced academic training. Chemical engineers apply their skills to solve important problems to provide economical, high quality chemicals for our technology-based industries. This ranges from drug companies, to the petroleum industry, to the electronic materials production industry.

Civil Engineering

Civil engineers play a major role in the development and management of society¹s physical infrastructure. They engage in the planning, design, construction and maintenance of buildings, bridges, dams, airports, highways, subways, transportation networks, energy resource development projects, offshore structures, canals, irrigation systems, subdivisions, harbors and water supply and waste treatment facilities. Civil engineers must have expertise in analysis, design, computer applications, and management. They work for all levels of government and in a variety of consulting engineering firms. Civil engineers study buildings, bridges, their foundations, and highways. They invent safer and more economical ways of construction, adapt the natural water supplies to people’s needs, and find ways to control and reduce environmental pollution and hazardous wastes. Civil engineers must make decisions and consider a broad range of factors such as required resources, aesthetic values, and environmental, economic, legal, sociological, and technological limitations.

Computer Engineering

Computer engineers design and build digital technology devices and systems that are capable of transforming society. These systems include very high speed supercomputers, cell phones, telecommunications devices, signal-processing functions in numerically controlled machine tooling, computer-aided machine design, tomography (CAT scans) and medical imaging (ultrasound), speech analysis and synthesis, and picture and data communication. Computer engineering concerned itself with the design, efficient use, and research of all sizes and manner of computers and digital systems. Computer engineers understand the fundamentals of computer logic and programming, as well as the fundamentals of electronics and general engineering-mathematics, mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and heat transfer. Engineers use this knowledge to create new devices and systems that satisfy human needs. Computer engineering is frequently linked with electrical engineering. Computer engineers are constantly improving the available technologies.

Computer Systems Engineering

The Computer System Engineering program combines computer science and computer engineering, exposing students to both computer hardware and software. The well-rounded approach tackles the principles of computer science, analog and digital electronics, as well as microprocessor/microcontroller systems. Curriculum tracks specializing in digital signal processing, computer architecture, and system automation and robotics are offered. With these, students in this program gain the knowledge of developing application-specific hardware and system software. Possible course projects include development of industrial and mobile robotics, intelligent automated systems, and adaptive and non-adaptive audio and image processing applications. Computer System Engineering graduates are trained to become developers of automated systems and system software. They can pursue careers as microprocessor systems designers, embedded system engineers, test engineers, and system software developers.

Construction/Building Engineering

A program in Construction Engineering program is designed to develop graduates with extensive and comprehensive knowledge on construction methods and materials as well as on management of infrastructures including its technological issues, financial and legal aspects. The program exposes the students to activities and issues of planning, financing, procuring, constructing, and managing the built environment. Through these combined technical and management backgrounds graduates are expected to be competent in solving practical problems on issues related to the management of construction companies.

Electrical Engineering

Electrical Engineering is a broad-based and rapidly growing field that encompasses everything from batteries and power supplies to microchip fabrication to the invention of autonomous robots and devices that can recognize human speech. Electrical engineers design, develop, test and supervise the manufacturing of electrical equipment. Our society depends upon electrical engineers for computer chips, microprocessors, radar systems, electric utilities, machinery controls, lighting, aerospace navigation systems, wiring in buildings and wiring in autos. Everything that uses, produces or distributes electricity is dependent upon electrical engineers for their development and maintenance.

Electronics and Communications Engineering

The Electronics and Communications Engineering program aims to train licensed engineers who have a competent grasp of both the science and technology of modern electronics and telecommunications. The student curriculum incorporates exposure to industry as well as on-the-job training that will enhance the student’s professional preparation. The students participate in research projects that demand scientific rigor and technical skills be demonstrated within an environment of innovation and entrepreneurship. The interdisciplinary characteristics of this science-based program allow our graduates to enter a vast field of employment in electronics, computers, telecommunications, information technology, biomedical fields, and other related fields as designers, managers, researchers, and teachers.

Engineering Management

Engineering management prepares students to integrate management skills with engineering skills to solve complex problems in manufacturing, product development and service delivery. To be successful, a company must be able to efficiently produce its products. It must be able to create good product designs and convert them into workable production plans. This requires engineers with management skills who can design, develop, and improve production systems. These managers must assure the company that every product or service is of good quality and of reasonable cost. Students in these fields must understand and be able to improve on modern manufacturing processes and systems, design tools and plan production. They must understand modern computer controlled manufacturing and know when and where to apply these technologies.

Environmental (and Sanitary) Engineering

Keeping our air and water clean, developing systems to minimize health risks from hazardous waste, and promoting regulations for industries all fall under environmental engineering. In this major, you’ll learn about the impact of different industries on the environment, possible strategies for reversing damaging effects, ways to provide potable water and reduce air pollution, and the safest methods of waste disposal. You’ll tackle the specific ways that our environment affects our health and what measures we can take individually and as a society to. Special interests might include hydrology, hazardous substance treatment, hydraulics, or geostatistical modeling. Some programs will even have you drafting mock legislation that, for example, protects wildlife reserves. By the time you’ve completed your studies, you’ll be better able to understand the health-to-environment relationship and how it can (and should be) optimized. Studies in environmental/environmental health/sanitary engineering involve many different, often overlapping fields: infectious disease, biology, chemistry, biostatistics, epidemiology, toxicology, nutrition, and math. In most programs, you’ll enhance your classroom knowledge with hands-on research and laboratory work.

Geodetic Engineering

Geodesy also called geodetics, is the scientific discipline that deals with the measurement and representation of the earth, its gravitational field and geodynamic phenomena (polar motion, earth tides, and crustal motion) in three-dimensional, time-varying space. Geodesy is primarily concerned with positioning and the gravity field and geometrical aspects of their temporal variations, although it can also include the study of the Earth’s magnetic field. A geodetic engineering graduate is expected to be able to execute control surveys; mineral, hydrographic, and topographic surveys; photogrammetric surveys; gravimetric surveys; and astronomical observations. In the view of the comprehensive training, opportunities after graduation are very great and he is unlikely to find difficulty looking for work. The courses deal more on the fundamentals and the core of the various branches of geodesy. To equip the student with sufficient background knowledge in understanding the various geodetic engineering operations, courses in mathematical methods, electronics, and cartography are introduced. Also included are subjects in general photo-interpretation and physical geodesy. The scope of geodetic surveying and geodetic astronomy now includes electronic surveying and satellite observations.

Geological/Geotechnical Engineering

Geotechnical (or geological) Engineering combines the fields of Geology, technology and Engineering in a way that makes a lot of sense: majors study how human beings can put the earth to safe and efficient use. For example, they learn how to evaluate a site on which a tunnel, dam, or road might be built. They learn about geologic hazards, such as earthquakes and volcanoes, and how to best protect people from them. They examine ways to search for and harvest energy resources. They also discover ways to protect the earth while still exploiting it through careful industrial practices. Geological Engineering is very much field oriented; much of your study will be hands-on research. Your studies will involve laboratory work, computer work, and problem-solving.

Industrial Engineering

Industrial Engineering challenges you to improve, design, manage, evaluate, and test production systems. You’ll be looking at the how’s of the economy; this means looking at how a product is made or a service is given, and your ultimate goal is to improve the quality of those products and services. Unlike other engineering majors, Industrial Engineering focuses on people. You’ll have classes in ergonomics and human factors and study how people are a part of a production system, of course investigating how they can do work more efficiently, or how a production system can be designed to better serve them. Although Industrial Engineers originally only dealt with manufacturing, today they have a wider range of options. Food, banking, health care, and commercial aviation are only a few of the sectors that rely on Industrial Engineers to make them more effectively deliver their wares. The skills of Industrial Engineers better countless aspects of our society.

Information Engineering

Information Engineering is an engineering program focusing on “information” – its principles, technologies, services, and applications. It is a relatively new discipline that leads the world into the information age, of which we are particularly more interested in understanding how information can be stored and represented, how information can be transmitted through networks in means of multimedia, and how information can be processed for various services and applications. Information Engineering is becoming more and more important as industries are adopting information technologies as their strategy assets to enhance their productivity, to create new businesses, and to offer better services to their customers. Information engineering involves the fundamental principles of various kinds of technologies. Analytical problem solving techniques, with the help of mathematics and other related theories, are applied to engineering design problems. Hardware skills are learnt through the state-of-the-art computer-aided-design tools. Software skills focus on the design and the development of computer network systems, which are essential for supporting information-intensive applications.

Landscape Architecture

Landscape architects develop inventive, site-appropriate solutions that enhance their physical surroundings whether these are buildings, parks, home or public places. Landscape architecture is an expression of cultural and personal values. It is enhanced by interaction with other academic fields including horticulture, architecture, city and regional planning, and fine arts. Landscape architecture includes landscape preservation, development and enhancement. To do this, the landscape architect may be involved in the investigation, selection, and allocation of land and water resources for appropriate use, feasibility studies, formulation of graphic and written criteria to govern the planning and design of land construction programs, the preparation, review, and analysis of master plans for land use and development; the production of overall site plans, landscape grading and landscape drainage plans, irrigation plans, the planting plans, and construction details; specifications; cost estimates and reports for land development; collaboration in the design of roads, bridges, and structures with respect to the functional and aesthetic requirements of the areas on which they are to be placed; negotiation and arrangement for execution of land area projects; field observation and inspection of land area construction, restoration, and maintenance.

Manufacturing Engineering

The program in manufacturing engineering is built on a core designed to provide a firm foundation in the various elements of manufacturing and systems engineering. Graduates will be able to: understand and integrate the design, test & build product life cycle; model, analyze and control design and production activities; understand the impact of quality, cost and timeliness metrics on manufacturing performance; demonstrate a basic understanding of manufacturing processes and technologies; perform data analysis and optimization for decision making; develop business cases for justifying process, organizational and technological projects; support for systems engineering and project management; communicate effectively (written, verbal and presentation) across all levels in the enterprise.

Materials Science and Engineering

Work and study in the field of materials science and engineering is grounded in an understanding of why materials behave the way they do, and encompasses how materials are made and how new ones can be developed. For example, the way materials are processed is often important. Today we demand more from our materials than mechanical strength, of course–electrical, optical, and magnetic properties, for example, are crucial for many applications. As a result, modern materials science focuses on ceramics, polymers, and semiconductors, as well as on materials, such as metals and glasses, that have a long history of use. If you wish to study in this field your interests should include a curiosity about nature and the physical sciences and about puzzles and mysteries. Skills or academic strengths that are helpful include the physical sciences, mathematics, communication skills, and the ability to work individually and with a team. Graduates in Materials Science and Engineering work in a variety of industrial activities, including manufacturing/processing, recycling, and the selection and design of materials for: aerospace vehicles, ground transportation systems, household appliances, energy conversion and utilization devices, biomedical applications, information and communication systems, electronic and magnetic devices, optical and optoelectronic components

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineers are typically involved with the generation, distribution, and use of energy; the processing of materials; the control and automation of manufacturing systems; the design and development of machines; and the solutions to environmental problems. Research, testing manufacturing, operations, marketing, and administration are other key activities associated with practicing mechanical engineers. Through clever use of analysis, modeling, design, and synthesis, they solve important problems to improve our quality of life.

Metallurgical Engineering

Metallurgical Engineering is a broad field that deals with all sorts of metal-related areas. The three main branches of this major are physical metallurgy, extractive metallurgy, and mineral processing. Physical metallurgy deals with problem solving: You’ll develop the sorts of metallic alloys needed for different types of manufacturing and construction. Extractive metallurgy involves extracting metal from ore. Mineral processing involves gathering mineral products from the earth’s crust. As a Metallurgical Engineering major, you’ll learn the fundamentals of all three fields, as well as the basics of engineering in general. We need metals to make our society function—metals make up important parts of cars, bikes, planes, buildings, even toothpaste tubes. Your knowledge of the production, design, and manufacturing of these metals and mineral products can be rewarding and exciting.

Mining Engineering

Mining is a valuable and technologically advanced industry. It provides the raw materials and energy resources needed to sustain modern civilization. Mining engineers use their knowledge of geology, mining and instrumentation related to these disciplines to solve problems involved in the development and production of minerals. They prospect for mineral deposits; plan, design, reclaim, and operate mines; assist in processing and marketing minerals that are extracted; insure safe and healthy working conditions. Mining engineers operate mines in a profitable, safe, and environmentally conscientious manner. Mining operations use mobile equipment that is larger than that found in any other industry. Mining methods and equipment can be applied to the removal of earth and rock outside the mining industry.

Nanoengineering

Nanoengineering is the practice of engineering on the nanoscale (a scale with measures smaller than one micrometer). It derives its name from the nanometers, a unit of measurement equalling one billionth of a meter. The objective behind nanoengineering isn’t much different from ordinary engineering; that is, to design and assemble functional devices from the available components. Nanoengineers are already assembling those components into functional devices such as nanoparticle films for space aged coatings and gene chips for medical diagnostics.

Network Engineering

With the growing importance of corporate networks and the Internet, there is a need for qualified individuals in computer networks. The Network Engineering Program answers this need by equipping student with the skills and knowledge to develop and manage multi-platform corporate and service provider networks. Students will take courses on network design, management integration, migration, security, and operating systems, Knowledge in analog and digital electronics will enable them to develop network-enabled devices while network-programming concepts will allow them to develop network-based software. Graduates of the programs are highly eligible to pursue careers as network engineers, network administrators, network security administrators, network designers, firmware developers, network analysts, and network auditors.

Graduate Major Descriptions:

Agricultural Engineering

Agricultural/biological engineering and bioengineering are swiftly evolving fields that integrate the principles of biological and physical sciences and use them to solve agricultural and environmental problems. Engineers in these fields design systems and equipment that increase agricultural productivity and food safety. They also manage and conserve soil, water, air, energy, and other agricultural resources. As an agricultural/biological engineering or bioengineering major, you’ll learn the skills of engineering as they relate to agriculture, food production, and resource conservation. For example, as a bioengineer, your interests might lie in working to create a breed of fatter, tastier tomatoes (non-attacking variety) or speeding up the fermentation of grape juice into wine. You’ll take advanced and difficult courses in many different subjects, including math, physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. Laboratory work and computer science will also be big components of your studies

Architecture

The objective of the Master of Architecture program is to provide opportunities for innovative advancement in the field of architecture through professional and scholarly endeavors. Course work and research activities are designed for a deeper understanding of the design process in a man-environment setting.

Bioengineering

Bioengineering applies advances in science, engineering and technology to the solution of human, animal and plant problems. Advancements are being made in the field of bioengineering constantly. Much of the work in the field has to do with the relief of pain caused by diseases and injuries. The field of bioengineering has come under much stress and strain lately due to restrictions from the government and debates over stem cell research and cloning. Bioengineering is constantly growing and developing. A student who chooses to major in bioengineering enters a field where there is much exciting work with cells and laboratory research centering on cell and tissue engineering, biomechanics, neural engineering and rehabilitative engineering. Students studying bioengineering are those who are prone to math and science. Students who enjoy work in the math and science areas typically enjoy bioengineering. In addition, students need to have concern for ethical dilemmas concerning the field of bioengineering and cell construction.

Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical engineers have saved and improved lives of people around the globe through breakthroughs and innovations that have helped solve problems that have baffled the industry for years. Patients who benefit from an artificial organ or a prosthetic limb, for example, have biomedical engineers to thank. Through your major in biomedical engineering, you’ll learn how to use physics, chemistry, mathematics, and engineering to produce solutions to important biological and medical problems. Topics span from the fundamental studies of biological structures to applied medical device design and evaluation. Many of your investigations will involve the design and development of implantable or indwelling devices such as orthopedic, cardiac, endovascular, drug delivery, or cell- and tissue-engineered systems. As a biomedical engineering major, you’ll also be responsible for understanding laboratory techniques, concepts of engineering design, and the ethics involved when practicing the development of biomedical devices and systems. Through research you’ll see practical applications of the laws of biology and how what you study leads to new advancements in fields far outside the realm of engineering. Many biomedical engineering programs also cover the basics of our healthcare system, meaning you could study health management systems and legal and ethical issues in healthcare. Graduates may find themselves working with pharmaceuticals, medical devices, artificial organs, prosthetics and sensory aids, diagnostics, medical instrumentation, or medical imaging.

Chemical Engineering

Chemical engineers apply the basic principles of chemistry, physics, mathematics and related engineering disciplines to the production of goods and materials for society. Chemical engineers solve a variety of problems involving chemicals. They design equipment and develop processes for chemical manufacturing on small or large scales. A chemical engineering graduate has the capability for serving the needs of industry or government or for pursuing advanced academic training. Chemical engineers apply their skills to solve important problems to provide economical, high quality chemicals for our technology-based industries. This ranges from drug companies, to the petroleum industry, to the electronic materials production industry.

Civil Engineering

Civil engineers play a major role in the development and management of society¹s physical infrastructure. They engage in the planning, design, construction and maintenance of buildings, bridges, dams, airports, highways, subways, transportation networks, energy resource development projects, offshore structures, canals, irrigation systems, subdivisions, harbors and water supply and waste treatment facilities. Civil engineers must have expertise in analysis, design, computer applications, and management. They work for all levels of government and in a variety of consulting engineering firms. Civil engineers study buildings, bridges, their foundations, and highways. They invent safer and more economical ways of construction, adapt the natural water supplies to people’s needs, and find ways to control and reduce environmental pollution and hazardous wastes. Civil engineers must make decisions and consider a broad range of factors such as required resources, aesthetic values, and environmental, economic, legal, sociological, and technological limitations.

Computer Engineering

Computer engineers design and build digital technology devices and systems that are capable of transforming society. These systems include very high speed supercomputers, cell phones, telecommunications devices, signal-processing functions in numerically controlled machine tooling, computer-aided machine design, tomography (CAT scans) and medical imaging (ultrasound), speech analysis and synthesis, and picture and data communication. Computer engineering concerned itself with the design, efficient use, and research of all sizes and manner of computers and digital systems. Computer engineers understand the fundamentals of computer logic and programming, as well as the fundamentals of electronics and general engineering-mathematics, mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and heat transfer. Engineers use this knowledge to create new devices and systems that satisfy human needs. Computer engineering is frequently linked with electrical engineering. Computer engineers are constantly improving the available technologies.

Construction Engineering

The Master of Science in Construction Engineering program is designed to develop graduates with extensive and comprehensive knowledge on construction methods and materials as well as on management of infrastructures including its technological issues, financial and legal aspects. The program exposes the students to activities and issues of planning, financing, procuring, constructing, and managing the built environment. Through these combined technical and management backgrounds graduates are expected to be competent in solving practical problems on issues related to the management of construction companies. The program is particularly attractive to architects and civil engineers who want to specialize on project leadership, management and finance to compete successfully in the national and international arenas.

Electrical Engineering

Electrical Engineering is a broad-based and rapidly growing field that encompasses everything from batteries and power supplies to microchip fabrication to the invention of autonomous robots and devices that can recognize human speech. Electrical engineers design, develop, test and supervise the manufacturing of electrical equipment. Our society depends upon electrical engineers for computer chips, microprocessors, radar systems, electric utilities, machinery controls, lighting, aerospace navigation systems, wiring in buildings and wiring in autos. Everything that uses, produces or distributes electricity is dependent upon electrical engineers for their development and maintenance.

Electronics and Communication Engineering

The Electronics and Communications Engineering program aims to train licensed engineers who have a competent grasp of both the science and technology of modern electronics and telecommunications. The student curriculum incorporates exposure to industry as well as on-the-job training that will enhance the student’s professional preparation. The students participate in research projects that demand scientific rigor and technical skills be demonstrated within an environment of innovation and entrepreneurship. The interdisciplinary characteristics of this science-based program allow our graduates to enter a vast field of employment in electronics, computers, telecommunications, information technology, biomedical fields, and other related fields as designers, managers, researchers, and teachers.

Energy Engineering

The program prepares students to perform state-of-the-art engineering work on energy systems by achieving a balance between hands-on experience and theory. Energy engineering draws students from all branches of engineering, physics, mathematics, and economics. The emphasis of the program is, of course, on the energy and power systems.

Engineering Science

The Master in Engineering Science seeks to develop a pool of highly trained teaching engineers in Mathematics and Physics. The Masters Program will provide a core of qualified faculty who will spearhead in raising the level of quality of engineering education in the private and public colleges and universities. The Master of Engineering Science aims to upgrade the academic qualifications of the engineering faculty to the level of master’s degree.The program also seeks to help the engineering faculty to advance professionally through theoretical and practical knowledge and to improve their teaching methods particularly in Mathematics and Physics. The program requires mastering a field of specialization through course work. The program involves intensive Mathematics, Physics and other related courses designed for higher level. Courses are complemented with a special project, which trains the graduate students to apply the theories and methods learned in class to actual/practical problems.

Environmental Engineering and Management

This master combines the study of environmental engineering and management. Environmental Engineering focuses on the design of collection and treatment processes for air, water, wastewater, and solid and hazardous waste, including study of the conceptual principles underlying biological, physical, and chemical treatment. Environmental Management emphasizes the relationships between environmental engineering/science and public policy with a focus on mathematical models used in decision-making and policy analysis and an emphasis on the role of economic factors in environmental management.

Financial Engineering

This master is a fusion of mathematics, statistics, information and computer technology to the study of finance. It is envisioned to be a highly competitive program that will equip students with a comprehensive set of tools to meet the requirements of a vibrant financial economy. It further seeks to identify and develop sound strategies and models that will meet the challenges of a dynamic financial environment amid competition, globalization, and advances in technology. Possible career opportunities in risk management, treasury management, investment banking, international trading, quantitative asset management, arbitrage, and financial research/forecasting await the successful graduate.

Geotechnical Engineering

Geotechnical (or geological) Engineering combines the fields of Geology, technology and Engineering in a way that makes a lot of sense: majors study how human beings can put the earth to safe and efficient use. For example, they learn how to evaluate a site on which a tunnel, dam, or road might be built. They learn about geologic hazards, such as earthquakes and volcanoes, and how to best protect people from them. They examine ways to search for and harvest energy resources. They also discover ways to protect the earth while still exploiting it through careful industrial practices. Geological Engineering is very much field oriented; much of your study will be hands-on research. Your studies will involve laboratory work, computer work, and problem-solving.

Industrial Engineering

Industrial Engineering challenges you to improve, design, manage, evaluate, and test production systems. You’ll be looking at the how’s of the economy; this means looking at how a product is made or a service is given, and your ultimate goal is to improve the quality of those products and services. Unlike other engineering majors, Industrial Engineering focuses on people. You’ll have classes in ergonomics and human factors and study how people are a part of a production system, of course investigating how they can do work more efficiently, or how a production system can be designed to better serve them. Although Industrial Engineers originally only dealt with manufacturing, today they have a wider range of options. Food, banking, health care, and commercial aviation are only a few of the sectors that rely on Industrial Engineers to make them more effectively deliver their wares. The skills of Industrial Engineers better countless aspects of our society.

Information Engineering

Information Engineering is an engineering program focusing on “information” – its principles, technologies, services, and applications. It is a relatively new discipline that leads the world into the information age, of which we are particularly more interested in understanding how information can be stored and represented, how information can be transmitted through networks in means of multimedia, and how information can be processed for various services and applications. Information Engineering is becoming more and more important as industries are adopting information technologies as their strategy assets to enhance their productivity, to create new businesses, and to offer better services to their customers. Information engineering involves the fundamental principles of various kinds of technologies. Analytical problem solving techniques, with the help of mathematics and other related theories, are applied to engineering design problems. Hardware skills are learnt through the state-of-the-art computer-aided-design tools. Software skills focus on the design and the development of computer network systems, which are essential for supporting information-intensive applications.

Land and Water Resources Engineering

The Master of Science in Land and Water Resources Engineering program aims to provide graduates intermediate and advanced study on measurements, modelling, design, management and operation of water processes and systems in natural and human environments. Courses related to resources planning and institutions, decision support systems, ecology, water and land resources infrastructure, economics, hydrology, hydraulics and quantitative methods are laid out to develop graduates with expertise in water resources engineering. Through this program graduates will be more equipped in solving practical problems and issues related to waterworks by applying innovative technological approaches supplemented with solid technical and management competencies.

Management Engineering

The Master of Science in Engineering Management offers opportunity to gain knowledge and skills pertinent to entrepreneurial and entrepreneurial management of existing and emerging technologies. The curriculum is designed to equip students with ability to analyze, design and manage industrial and business systems by exposing them to various training on decision making, strategizing, and operating. The program develops and prepares its graduates to become skilled leaders both in terms of managerial and technical abilities. The program is particularly appropriate to undergraduate with degree in the areas of business, technology, engineering, or industrial education.

Manufacturing Engineering and Management

The program in manufacturing engineering is built on a core designed to provide a firm foundation in the various elements of manufacturing and systems engineering. Graduates will be able to: understand and integrate the design, test & build product life cycle; model, analyze and control design and production activities; understand the impact of quality, cost and timeliness metrics on manufacturing performance; demonstrate a basic understanding of manufacturing processes and technologies; perform data analysis and optimization for decision making; develop business cases for justifying process, organizational and technological projects; support for systems engineering and project management; communicate effectively (written, verbal and presentation) across all levels in the enterprise.

Materials Science and Engineering

Work and study in the field of materials science and engineering is grounded in an understanding of why materials behave the way they do, and encompasses how materials are made and how new ones can be developed. For example, the way materials are processed is often important. Today we demand more from our materials than mechanical strength, of course–electrical, optical, and magnetic properties, for example, are crucial for many applications. As a result, modern materials science focuses on ceramics, polymers, and semiconductors, as well as on materials, such as metals and glasses, that have a long history of use. If you wish to study in this field your interests should include a curiosity about nature and the physical sciences and about puzzles and mysteries. Skills or academic strengths that are helpful include the physical sciences, mathematics, communication skills, and the ability to work individually and with a team. Graduates in Materials Science and Engineering work in a variety of industrial activities, including manufacturing/processing, recycling, and the selection and design of materials for: aerospace vehicles, ground transportation systems, household appliances, energy conversion and utilization devices, biomedical applications, information and communication systems, electronic and magnetic devices, optical and optoelectronic components

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineers are typically involved with the generation, distribution, and use of energy; the processing of materials; the control and automation of manufacturing systems; the design and development of machines; and the solutions to environmental problems. Research, testing manufacturing, operations, marketing, and administration are other key activities associated with practicing mechanical engineers. Through clever use of analysis, modeling, design, and synthesis, they solve important problems to improve our quality of life.

Metallurgical Engineering

Metallurgical Engineering is a broad field that deals with all sorts of metal-related areas. The three main branches of this major are physical metallurgy, extractive metallurgy, and mineral processing. Physical metallurgy deals with problem solving: You’ll develop the sorts of metallic alloys needed for different types of manufacturing and construction. Extractive metallurgy involves extracting metal from ore. Mineral processing involves gathering mineral products from the earth’s crust. As a Metallurgical Engineering major, you’ll learn the fundamentals of all three fields, as well as the basics of engineering in general. We need metals to make our society function—metals make up important parts of cars, bikes, planes, buildings, even toothpaste tubes. Your knowledge of the production, design, and manufacturing of these metals and mineral products can be rewarding and exciting.

Remote Sensing

Remote Sensing is the science dealing with the detection and/or identification of an object, series of objects, or landscape without having the sensor in direct contact with the object. The most common forms include color and color infrared aerial photography, satellite imaging and radar sensing. Remote Sensing provides a unique perspective from which to observe large regions because sensors can measure energy at wavelengths which are beyond the range of human vision (ultra-violet, infrared, microwave). Moreover, global monitoring is possible from nearly any site on earth.

Structural Engineering

The Master of Science in Structural Engineering program intends to provide graduates with additional fundamental knowledge as well as specialized advanced knowledge in selected structural engineering aspects over and above the undergraduate degree course work. It provides opportunity to develop in-depth understanding on foundation design, structural materials such as concrete and steel and on specialized courses such as earthquake engineering. This program also enhances the analytical responses of graduates on different structural materials in terms of finite element analysis, limit analysis and structural dynamics. Expertise on these areas will enable undergraduates from civil engineering program and other related fields to be globally competitive principally in the field of structural engineering.

Tropical Landscape Architecture

The graduate program leading to the degree of Master of Tropical Landscape Architecture aims to instill in the student a systematic outlook in the interplay of built-forms with the natural surroundings so that these do not become inimical to the cultural and social fabric of the locale. The program is responsive to the pressing need to elevate the profession of landscape architecture to a point where it shall significantly benefit human kind, the educational philosophy of the program is for nurturing man in his environment and for the enhancement of the beneficial ecological forces through deliberate design of the land. Culture and behavior through infrastructure shall be instilled upon the participants of the program. Environmental awareness and the development of professional competence shall be the essence of the program which shall be implemented through: conferences, research undertakings, publications and documentation, community outreach and international cooperation and exchange.

Urban and Regional Planning

Urban and regional planning deals with cities and people, human services and infrastructure, fiscal issues and environmental concerns. The field blends intellectual, aesthetic and interpersonal skills. It aims to integrate knowledge with action in the pursuit of more just, efficient and sustainable cities. Planners typically work for city, provincial and federal governments, consulting firms, non-governmental organizations, and development corporations. They help prepare policies and programs in areas such as land use, housing, parks and recreation, local economic development, environmental services, transportation, health and social services. They participate in the development and management of facilities and services. They interact with politicians, bureaucrats, developers and citizen groups. Urban and regional planning is a profession with a long tradition of social service. Concern for the rights and needs of disadvantaged and marginalized sectors of the population, the equitable distribution of resources, and the involvement of citizens in community decisions have been hallmarks of this profession.