Science & Technology


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Overview

Example classes within this interest area

Example careers

Relevance to Myanmar

What students have said

Undergraduate Majors

Graduate Majors


Overview:

Science is a rational way of gathering information about how nature works. Although procedures vary from one field of inquiry to another, there are identifiable features that distinguish scientific inquiry from other methods of developing knowledge. Scientists propose a hypothesis as explanation of a natural phenomenon and in order to prove this hypothesis they do researches and experiments and observe their consequences. If the observed phenomenon always reproduces the same results, the scientist is able to formulate the theory about it. The most important thing about this so called scientific method of investigation is that a theory can’t be formulated without rational proofs and nevertheless a proven scientific theory is always open to falsification, if new evidence is presented. The scientific method provides an objective process to find solutions to problems in a number of scientific and technological fields.

Most science majors will involve some degree of research and laboratory work. You’ll learn how to gather and analyze data and how to present your results in papers or presentations. You’ll also learn how to interpret others’ research results and how to critically read scientific literature. Usually students choosing a science related major have a natural curiosity to learn how things work and like doing experiments and laboratory research.

Science and Technology majors may include the following classes:

  • Geometry
  • Algebra
  • Calculus
  • Statistics
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Physics
  • Geology
  • Ecology
  • Computer Science

Example careers:

  • Biologist
  • Physician
  • Chemist
  • Biochemist
  • Pharmacist
  • Geneticist
  • Researcher
  • Scientist
  • Professor

Relevance to Myanmar:

Science and technology are related to the current situation in Myanmar. As the Myanmar economy is based on extractive industries such as mining and oil and natural gas exploration, there will continue to be a demand for graduates of the hard sciences including geologists, chemists, and physicists. If you connect this to the current management of such industries, you will find that biologists, ecologists, researchers, geneticists, and biochemists will be essential to assess the impacts on the environment. As the economy of Myanmar grows, there will be a demand for more electricity, which will naturally include hydroelectricity, as well as oil and natural gas. There will need to be trained professional scientists who are able to assess potential of these future projects as well as those who assess their impacts.

What Students Have Said:

Why is the subject you studied (or are studying now) important for Myanmar?

  • because of the quality education I got from abroad in a double major of physics and mathematics
  • because I studied subjects not popular in Myanmar, and that means there are a limited number of people in this field, which makes me in demand
  • because I will be a resource person in this field, especially in Physics.

How have you been able to use your education after you graduated (or how will you in the future)?

  • I couldn’t use it at first, but after working, and volunteering for more than 3 years, yes I have confidence to engage more professionally in what I am doing.
  • Direct way: as a Physics tutor at one of the local colleges (teaching astronomy)
  • Indirect way: using the analysis, researching, organizing, in our present works. This broad curriculum of Physics and math are a great asset for my future career including data analysis, program management, and strategic planning.

What are the real job opportunities to work for Myanmar with your degree?

I do not believe anyone will hire a physics major directly to work, but I can assure you that someone will have to pick up career by learning through experiences, or I will call it value added to your existing degree. For myself, I had to take another management training, 3 years of volunteer experiences, and many more readings, in order to work in the corporate fields, such as NGOs, UN, and Business where I currently do work. After extra efforts then there will be a job opportunity for you as me.

Undergraduate Majors:

Graduate Majors:

Undergraduate Major Descriptions:

Applied Mathematics and Computational Science

Applied Mathematics/Computational Science provides students with both the solid grounding in undergraduate mathematics as well as the confidence and skill to use computers in professional computing. It shares in almost all the mathematical courses of a Mathematics major but takes the focus of computing and seeks to develop in the students the ability to employ the computer to tackle a variety of scientific problems. The program is a good preparation for students who intend to pursue a career requiring the mix of mathematics and computers such as in computer programming, systems design and analysis, telecommunications networking, or for those who wish to pursue graduate studies in any quantitative field.

Applied Mathematics and Mathematical Finance

Mathematical Finance is a flourishing area of modern science, which has rapidly developed into a substantial body of knowledge. The theory of finance has become increasingly mathematical to the point that problems in finance are now driving research in mathematics. This program aims to produce graduates with rigorous foundation in mathematical modeling and economics of financial markets combined with keen knowledge of business practices that will enable them to enter competitively the pool of potential employees of investment banks and other financial institutions. Graduates can also pursue a higher research degree in mathematical finance.

Applied Physics

At the center of the Applied Physics major is physics. And not just the plain old regular physics you may be used too, but quantum physics, lasers, and waves. The Applied Physics major, though, goes beyond regular physics into highly specialized areas of concentration that have direct applications to the real world you’ll be working in someday. Areas of concentration include, but are definitely not limited too: electrical engineering devices, non-destructive evaluation, and fluid mechanics. With technology’s constantly expanding influence in our society, a major in Applied Physics could place you at the forefront of the next technology revolution.

Biochemistry

Biochemistry is the discipline in which scientists combine chemistry and biology to investigate living systems and their relationship to the environment. Some specializations of biochemistry include microbiology, the study of microorganisms, and zoology, the study of animals. A biochemist is concerned with what effects the environment, diseases, foods and chemicals have on living things. Most biochemists engage in research, industrial or food industry, biochemistry and clinical (hospital industry) biochemistry. Biochemists develop methods for testing, run the tests, and write reports about the results of the tests. The testing is to develop new technologies, treatments, medicines and vaccines for treating diseases and reducing other environmental concerns. Other biochemists tend to work in universities, private laboratories, cosmetics industries, and agricultural research for the government.

Biology

Biology is the study of life from the cellular structure of plants and animals to the environmental issues of a local or global nature. A biologist investigates how organisms are structured, how they evolve, how their life processes function and how they interact with the rest of the environment. Most biologists conduct research to answer the basic questions of how organisms are interrelated. The result of this research can include advances in medicine and public policy. This major prepares you for a multitude of employment possibilities including graduate schools and careers in biomedicine and research, allied health, private industry, and education. Many pre-medicine, pre-dentistry and pre-veterinary science majors enroll in biology as their undergraduate major.

Biomedical Science

Biomedical science combines the fields of biology and medicine in order to focus on the health of both animals and humans. As a biomedical science student, you’ll study biochemical and physiological functions, anatomical and histological structures, epidemiology, and pharmacology. You’ll learn how to both maintain and promote health in humans and animals with knowledge in the basics of nutrition, diseases, and immunology. Delve into fields such as cell and molecular biology, parasitology, and toxicology, and emerge with hands-on experience through laboratory work and research. As a biomedical science student, you may go on to make advancements in the study of cancer or AIDS, become involved in the research of infectious diseases, or propel science toward improving the human condition in any of hundreds of other ways.

Biotechnology

Biotechnology purpose is analyzing and figuring out the genetic structure of everything from the human heart to the soybean. Biotechnology is a new and very, very hot field. Building on the advancements made through molecular biology and biochemistry, biotechnology is centered on the ways we can manipulate and exploit genes. You’ll learn about how genes operate and how those operations can be altered. By combining just about every science known to man (chemistry, biology, food science, animal science, earth science, and plant science, for starters) this major is perfect for the student who wants to know how every living thing works. Biotechnology is closely linked with molecular biology.

Chemistry

Chemistry is a science that is considered the foundation of many other sciences. Chemists study atoms, molecules and the properties of compound substances. They study how they are structured, how they function, and how they change energy when combined with other substances. Chemists conduct research in laboratories that has led to advances in food processing, agriculture and medicine. Students in chemistry find are prepared many vocations including work in chemistry, biochemistry, geochemistry, chemical engineering or medicine. They find their broad training useful in other fields such as teaching, business management, law, environmental consulting and government. Chemistry is an appropriate major for those wishing to proceed in health sciences such as clinical chemistry, pharmacology, and medicine. Since chemistry is a foundation science, majors often have to choose a specialization. These specializations are categorized as research with living things or the structure, function and nature of atoms and molecules.

Clothing Technology

The program offers courses in clothing design, production, merchandising and research. A graduate of the program qualifies for managerial and technical positions in garment and textiles manufacturing, buying, trading companies, retail service and research establishments.

Cosmetic Science

The program will enable students to learn the techniques in formulating cosmetics, toiletries and fragrances. The course will also provide students entrepreneural skills such that after graduation they maybe able to put up their own cosmetic industry. An undergraduate research will enable the students to discover or invent new cosmetic product innovations or provide solutions to problems in cosmetic industry. The program objectives are: to learn the techniques and to develop the skills in formulating cosmetic toiletries and fragrances, to provide entrepreneural skills among students, to provide manpower for the growing cosmetic industry, to value the importance of natural resources in cosmetic preparations.

Food Science

Food science is a discipline concerned with all technical aspects of food, beginning with harvesting or slaughtering, and ending with its cooking and consumption. Food scientists deal with almost every aspect of food production. They are the brains behind the genetically engineered ear of corn, the doctors of the meat packing industry. Food scientists shape the way we eat by helping to create and enforce new safety standards, expand our understanding of what constitutes a balanced meal, and improve the ways we produce and consume food. Examples of the activities of food scientists include the development of new food products, design of processes to produce these foods, choice of packaging materials, shelf-life studies, sensory evaluation of the product with trained expert panels or potential consumers, as well as microbiological and chemical testing. Food scientists at universities may study more fundamental phenomena that are directly linked to the production of particular food product and its properties. Food science is a highly interdisciplinary applied science. It incorporates concepts from many different fields including microbiology, chemical engineering, biochemistry, and many others.

Food Technology

This program is designed to fill the need for food technologists who are trained to manage the production lines and handle supervisory responsibilities in food processing industries.

Forensic Science

Forensic science is the application of science to legal issues. The objective of a forensic scientist is to be objective, search for evidence, and serve justice by determining facts involved in a case. Legal issues occur in criminal and civil cases. Forensic science, applied to criminal cases, deals with the observation and collection of evidence such as bodily fluids, hair, textile or fiber materials, paint, handwriting analysis, glass, or tool marks. Forensic science, applied to civil cases, is concerned with determining responsibility for accidents. There are many sciences or activities that can be considered forensic, such as medicine, dentistry, photography, fingerprints, crime scene investigator, and voice analysis. A student of forensic science will be objective, curious, logical, and analytical, and like to solve problems. This student may enjoy the challenge of solving a mystery. A successful student must possess good verbal and written communication. Often a strong interest in chemistry is important.

Genetics

Genetics is the science of heredity. In other words, it’s the study of which genes are responsible for which physical traits in humans and other organisms. Genetics has many subcategories of more specific studies. Many Geneticists eventually choose to focus on molecular genetics, which includes, among other things, cancer research. In this field, you would study how cell growth, reproduction, and mutation leads to cancer and how to stop (or reverse) the process. You might eventually concentrate on human gene therapy, in which you’d study the possible treatments and cures for currently incurable diseases like cystic fibrosis. You might also choose to become involved in genetic engineering, which uses the fundamentals of Genetics to alter and improve plants, animals, and other organisms.

Geology

The study of geology deals with fascinating and practical questions about the materials composing the Earth and the many processes that operate beneath and upon the Earth’s surface. Exploring such questions fosters understanding of the magnitude of the changes, which human demands and activities have worked upon the Earth. Therefore it is essential in developing an appropriate response to today’s environmental crisis. Historical geology examines the Earth within a historical context. Much of historical geology is devoted to understanding the evolution of life, from primitive organisms in ancient seas to complex plant and animal forms present today. The evolution of life is inexorably linked to the physical processes acting on the Earth, processes such as plate tectonics and erosion. Geology also includes the study of the history of life on the Earth, and the planets, and of the processes that drive the historical evolution. The study of historical evolution through “deep time” is what fundamentally distinguishes geology from other physical sciences. Applied studies include the study of mineral resources including oil and water; the identification and mitigation of Earth hazards such as earthquakes, landslides, and volcanic eruptions; the identification and mitigation of polluted ground water; and land use planning.

Human Biology

Human Biology is a specific combination of studies of Human Anatomy, Physiology, Clinical Biochemistry and Biorganic Chemistry.

Marine Science/Studies

Marine Science is the study of the sea and its inhabitants. As a Marine Science student you’ll consume a wide variety of subjects to augment your understanding of this field: biology, chemistry, geology, and physics are only a few of the disciplines that will be incorporated into your studies. You’ll learn about the many reasons why the sea is important to us, how it affects us, and what we can and should do to preserve it. You’ll study pollution and other health issues. You’ll learn about the many living things that inhabit the sea and the evolution, diversity, and importance of these inhabitants. A Marine Science program will involve some degree of research and laboratory work. You’ll learn how to gather and analyze data and how to present your results in papers or presentations. You’ll also learn how to interpret others’ research results and how to critically read scientific literature.

Material Science

You’ll learn about the structure and properties of materials, and the relationships between them. You’ll learn what controls and affects internal structures, and the processes that can alter them. Why materials act the way they do will be one area of concentration; how materials are processed will be another. You’ll also learn how to produce new materials, and the variety of uses for existing ones. You’ll study a great deal of physics and chemistry in this major, and you’ll be immersed in a great deal of laboratory work. Communications technology, the computer industry, and biotechnology are just a few of the modern fields that require the expertise of materials scientists and engineers. As a Materials Science major, you’ll become skilled at identifying, characterizing, manufacturing, designing, and processing many materials we use in our everyday life.

Mathematics

Mathematics is a surprisingly effective tool for describing the natural world and a foundation of modern science. Some mathematical results were initially developed in order to solve internally generated mathematical problems and only later found application in other disciplines; other mathematical results were inspired by the needs of these other disciplines. The study of mathematics can reveal its beauty and wonder and can develop a student’s potential for logical thought. College mathematics has evolved from arithmetic and geometry to a variety of abstract and applied topics. Applications of mathematics occur in science, engineering, medicine, business, statistics, psychology, social science and other areas.

Microbiology

Microbiology is the branch of biology which deals with the smallest organisms in the world, such as bacteria, yeasts, algae, and protozoa. These organisms rank among the most helpful and the most harmful to human life and the environment. Microbiologists work to swing the balance in our favor. Microbiologists perform extensive medical research, investigating pathogenic (disease-causing) microorganisms. Microbiologists also help protect crops and purify our drinking water.

Molecular Biology

A major in molecular biology explores the cellular and sub-cellular levels of organisms, how these levels are structured, and how they function. You’ll learn how molecules operate and some of the chemical changes they encounter. Genetics is covered too—how it has shaped and continues to shape us and how molecules control our life processes. Regulation of cell growth, mechanisms of enzyme action, and DNA-protein interaction are all of interest. You’ll learn how organisms fight diseases and how they react to the environment. And after examining a host of scientific theories and questions, you’ll be ready to apply your molecular know-how to fields such as biotechnology, genetics, cell biology, and physiology. Your work in the classroom will be supplemented by extensive laboratory work, so you’ll get experience in designing and executing experiments and interpreting the data obtained from them. Your course work, though heavily weighted toward biology, will also consist of courses in chemistry, physics, and math. In addition to the fields mentioned above, a molecular biology major might lead you into the realm of biomedical research, medicine, or even something like technology law or technology business analysis. Your understanding of molecular structures and molecular skills will be a strong foundation for any of these paths.

Physics

Physicists are involved in almost every aspect of our highly technical civilization. They do research in universities and government laboratories, teach in high schools and secondary educational institutions, and work in high-tech industrial positions. Others go into law, finance, the medical profession, and the publishing and film industries. Physics has laid the groundwork for many advanced industries; including computers, telecommunications, lasers, and medical diagnostics. Physicists investigate many of the latest discoveries such as massive neutrinos, blue semiconductor lasers, high temperature superconductors, black holes, and our expanding universe. Physics is the fundamental science of the properties and interactions of matter and energy. Physics students study a great deal of mathematics in order to understand nature in mathematical terms. They obtain laboratory skills, design experiments and apply instrumentation, such as, electronics circuits and optical instruments, to observe and measure natural phenomena.

Statistics and Actuarial Science

Statistics is an interesting, applied area of mathematics. It is the extraction of information from mathematical data. Actuarial science is an offshoot of statistics. Actuarial science deals with statistical relations as they pertain to pensions, life insurance policies, car insurance, employment insurance, and the like. In the fields of statistics and actuarial sciences, individuals extract reliable data from complex databases. Statistical analysis is evolving constantly. Statistical and actuarial sciences focus on the extraction and interpretation of data in complex systems.

Zoology

Zoology is the study of animals. Zoologists study everything from the single cell to the entire organism and population of any given animal, they also take into consideration the larger environmental conditions in which animals live. From the desert to the rain forest and ocean, zoologists study the interplay between life elements. Some zoologists are interested in the biology of particular groups of animals. Others are concerned with the structure and function of animal bodies. Still others study how new animals are formed and how their characteristics are passed on from one generation to another. Zoologists study also the interactions of animals with one another and their environments, and the significance of the behavior of animals.

Graduate Major Descriptions:

Animal Science

Animals are an important part of our lives. Animal sciences seek to improve the lives of animals and their human companions. You may find jobs focused on caring for pets or assuring a safe food supply, preserving endangered species or protecting the public from animal-borne diseases. Animal science is the study of growth, breeding, genetics, and reproductive biology of livestock. One focus of this science is the caring for, selling, and growing of livestock. Another focus is scientific research on animals, including drugs and poisons that directly affect livestock. You could later pursue a career in livestock production

Biology

Biology is the study of life from the cellular structure of plants and animals to the environmental issues of a local or global nature. A biologist investigates how organisms are structured, how they evolve, how their life processes function and how they interact with the rest of the environment. Most biologists conduct research to answer the basic questions of how organisms are interrelated. The result of this research can include advances in medicine and public policy. This major prepares you for a multitude of employment possibilities including graduate schools and careers in biomedicine and research, allied health, private industry, and education.

Biochemistry

Biochemistry is the discipline in which scientists combine chemistry and biology to investigate living systems and their relationship to the environment. Some specializations of biochemistry include microbiology, the study of microorganisms, and zoology, the study of animals. A biochemist is concerned with what effects the environment, diseases, foods and chemicals have on living things. Most biochemists engage in research, industrial or food industry, biochemistry and clinical (hospital industry) biochemistry. Biochemists develop methods for testing, run the tests, and write reports about the results of the tests. The testing is to develop new technologies, treatments, medicines and vaccines for treating diseases and reducing other environmental concerns. Other biochemists tend to work in universities, private laboratories, cosmetics industries, and agricultural research for the government.

Biotechnology

Biotechnology purpose is analyzing and figuring out the genetic structure of everything from the human heart to the soybean. Biotechnology is a new and very, very hot field. Building on the advancements made through molecular biology and biochemistry, biotechnology is centered on the ways we can manipulate and exploit genes. You’ll learn about how genes operate and how those operations can be altered. By combining just about every science known to man (chemistry, biology, food science, animal science, earth science, and plant science, for starters) this major is perfect for the student who wants to know how every living thing works. Biotechnology is closely linked with molecular biology.

Chemistry

Chemistry is a science that is considered the foundation of many other sciences. Chemists study atoms, molecules and the properties of compound substances. They study how they are structured, how they function, and how they change energy when combined with other substances. Chemists conduct research in laboratories that has led to advances in food processing, agriculture and medicine. Students in chemistry find are prepared many vocations including work in chemistry, biochemistry, geochemistry, chemical engineering or medicine. They find their broad training useful in other fields such as teaching, business management, law, environmental consulting and government. Chemistry is an appropriate major for those wishing to proceed in health sciences such as clinical chemistry, pharmacology, and medicine. Since chemistry is a foundation science, majors often have to choose a specialization. These specializations are categorized as research with living things or the structure, function and nature of atoms and molecules.

Cosmetic Science

The program will enable students to learn the techniques in formulating cosmetics, toiletries and fragrances. The course will also provide students entrepreneural skills such that after graduation they maybe able to put up their own cosmetic industry. An undergraduate research will enable the students to discover or invent new cosmetic product innovations or provide solutions to problems in cosmetic industry. The program objectives are: to learn the techniques and to develop the skills in formulating cosmetic toiletries and fragrances, to provide entrepreneural skills among students, to provide manpower for the growing cosmetic industry, to value the importance of natural resources in cosmetic preparations.

Entomology

Entomology is the study of insects. Entomologists, the persons who study insects, observe, sample, rear and experiment with insects. Research undertaken by entomologists covers the total range of disciplines with a biological connotation and includes ecology, evolution, behavior and anatomy. Biologists work with insects for many reasons, such as simplicity of maintaining laboratory cultures, rapid reproduction tempo and population turnover and high population numbers

Food Science

Food science is a discipline concerned with all technical aspects of food, beginning with harvesting or slaughtering, and ending with its cooking and consumption. Food scientists deal with almost every aspect of food production. They are the brains behind the genetically engineered ear of corn, the doctors of the meat packing industry. Food scientists shape the way we eat by helping to create and enforce new safety standards, expand our understanding of what constitutes a balanced meal, and improve the ways we produce and consume food. Examples of the activities of food scientists include the development of new food products, design of processes to produce these foods, choice of packaging materials, shelf-life studies, sensory evaluation of the product with trained expert panels or potential consumers, as well as microbiological and chemical testing. Food scientists at universities may study more fundamental phenomena that are directly linked to the production of particular food product and its properties. Food science is a highly interdisciplinary applied science. It incorporates concepts from many different fields including microbiology, chemical engineering, biochemistry, and many others.

Food Technology

This program is designed to fill the need for food technologists who are trained to manage the production lines and handle supervisory responsibilities in food processing industries.

Forensic Science

Forensic science is the application of science to legal issues. The objective of a forensic scientist is to be objective, search for evidence, and serve justice by determining facts involved in a case. Legal issues occur in criminal and civil cases. Forensic science, applied to criminal cases, deals with the observation and collection of evidence such as bodily fluids, hair, textile or fiber materials, paint, handwriting analysis, glass, or tool marks. Forensic science, applied to civil cases, is concerned with determining responsibility for accidents. There are many sciences or activities that can be considered forensic, such as medicine, dentistry, photography, fingerprints, crime scene investigator, and voice analysis. A student of forensic science will be objective, curious, logical, and analytical, and like to solve problems. This student may enjoy the challenge of solving a mystery. A successful student must possess good verbal and written communication. Often a strong interest in chemistry is important.

Genetics

Genetics is the science of heredity. In other words, it’s the study of which genes are responsible for which physical traits in humans and other organisms. Genetics has many subcategories of more specific studies. Many Geneticists eventually choose to focus on molecular genetics, which includes, among other things, cancer research. In this field, you would study how cell growth, reproduction, and mutation leads to cancer and how to stop (or reverse) the process. You might eventually concentrate on human gene therapy, in which you’d study the possible treatments and cures for currently incurable diseases like cystic fibrosis. You might also choose to become involved in genetic engineering, which uses the fundamentals of Genetics to alter and improve plants, animals, and other organisms.

Geology

The study of geology deals with fascinating and practical questions about the materials composing the Earth and the many processes that operate beneath and upon the Earth’s surface. Exploring such questions fosters understanding of the magnitude of the changes, which human demands and activities have worked upon the Earth. Therefore it is essential in developing an appropriate response to today’s environmental crisis. Historical geology examines the Earth within a historical context. Much of historical geology is devoted to understanding the evolution of life, from primitive organisms in ancient seas to complex plant and animal forms present today. The evolution of life is inexorably linked to the physical processes acting on the Earth, processes such as plate tectonics and erosion. Geology also includes the study of the history of life on the Earth, and the planets, and of the processes that drive the historical evolution. The study of historical evolution through “deep time” is what fundamentally distinguishes geology from other physical sciences. Applied studies include the study of mineral resources including oil and water; the identification and mitigation of Earth hazards such as earthquakes, landslides, and volcanic eruptions; the identification and mitigation of polluted ground water; and land use planning.

Marine Science/Studies

Marine Science is the study of the sea and its inhabitants. As a Marine Science student you’ll consume a wide variety of subjects to augment your understanding of this field: biology, chemistry, geology, and physics are only a few of the disciplines that will be incorporated into your studies. You’ll learn about the many reasons why the sea is important to us, how it affects us, and what we can and should do to preserve it. You’ll study pollution and other health issues. You’ll learn about the many living things that inhabit the sea and the evolution, diversity, and importance of these inhabitants. A Marine Science program will involve some degree of research and laboratory work. You’ll learn how to gather and analyze data and how to present your results in papers or presentations. You’ll also learn how to interpret others’ research results and how to critically read scientific literature.

Master of Marine Affairs

This master program combines the study of contemporary issues in marine affairs, marine and coastal ecology, community-based coastal resources and marine law and policy in order to form professionals working for the development of the coastal and marine environment.

Material Science

You’ll learn about the structure and properties of materials, and the relationships between them. You’ll learn what controls and affects internal structures, and the processes that can alter them. Why materials act the way they do will be one area of concentration; how materials are processed will be another. You’ll also learn how to produce new materials, and the variety of uses for existing ones. You’ll study a great deal of physics and chemistry in this major, and you’ll be immersed in a great deal of laboratory work. Communications technology, the computer industry, and biotechnology are just a few of the modern fields that require the expertise of materials scientists and engineers. As a Materials Science major, you’ll become skilled at identifying, characterizing, manufacturing, designing, and processing many materials we use in our everyday life.

Mathematics

Mathematics is a surprisingly effective tool for describing the natural world and a foundation of modern science. Some mathematical results were initially developed in order to solve internally generated mathematical problems and only later found application in other disciplines; other mathematical results were inspired by the needs of these other disciplines. The study of mathematics can reveal its beauty and wonder and can develop a student’s potential for logical thought. College mathematics has evolved from arithmetic and geometry to a variety of abstract and applied topics. Applications of mathematics occur in science, engineering, medicine, business, statistics, psychology, social science and other areas.

Meteorology

Meteorology is the science that studies atmospheric phenomena, especially those that relate to weather. Meteorologists who forecast the weather rely on thousands of weather stations located around the world, both on land and at sea. At each station, measurements are taken of such things as air pressure and temperature, wind speed, cloud cover, and precipitation. Elsewhere, upper-level observations are made by weather balloons, and satellites, which send a continuous flow of photographs back to earth. All of this information is sent to national weather centers where it is plotted on charts and analyzed by meteorologists. A program in Meteorology aims to provide students with adequate education in meteorology that will prepare them for scientific careers in government, academic and research institution.

Microbiology

Microbiology is the branch of biology which deals with the smallest organisms in the world, such as bacteria, yeasts, algae, and protozoa. These organisms rank among the most helpful and the most harmful to human life and the environment. Microbiologists work to swing the balance in our favor. Microbiologists perform extensive medical research, investigating pathogenic (disease-causing) microorganisms. Microbiologists also help protect crops and purify our drinking water.

Molecular Biology

A major in molecular biology explores the cellular and sub-cellular levels of organisms, how these levels are structured, and how they function. You’ll learn how molecules operate and some of the chemical changes they encounter. Genetics is covered too—how it has shaped and continues to shape us and how molecules control our life processes. Regulation of cell growth, mechanisms of enzyme action, and DNA-protein interaction are all of interest. You’ll learn how organisms fight diseases and how they react to the environment. And after examining a host of scientific theories and questions, you’ll be ready to apply your molecular know-how to fields such as biotechnology, genetics, cell biology, and physiology. Your work in the classroom will be supplemented by extensive laboratory work, so you’ll get experience in designing and executing experiments and interpreting the data obtained from them. Your course work, though heavily weighted toward biology, will also consist of courses in chemistry, physics, and math. In addition to the fields mentioned above, a molecular biology major might lead you into the realm of biomedical research, medicine, or even something like technology law or technology business analysis. Your understanding of molecular structures and molecular skills will be a strong foundation for any of these paths.

Ocean Sciences/Oceanography

Oceanography is a relatively new discipline that is constantly discovering exciting findings about the Earth. The oceans represent more than 70 percent of Earth’s surface, much of which is unexplored and unstudied. Oceanographers have found and studied deep ocean trenches, revealed the mechanics behind plate tectonics and continental drift, revealed amazing life and helped us place the precarious ecologic balance of the oceans, atmosphere, ice, solid earth, and living organisms in a perspective that informs our policies and outlook on how the oceans affect our lives. Oceanography is a multidisciplinary area of exploration. The exploration of the world’s marine environments deals with many phenomena which we are just beginning to understand. These include climate change, plate tectonics, ocean circulation, marine biology and ecology, marine pharmaceuticals, seafloor mapping, seismology, beach erosion and atmospheric change.

Physics

Physicists are involved in almost every aspect of our highly technical civilization. They do research in universities and government laboratories, teach in high schools and secondary educational institutions, and work in high-tech industrial positions. Others go into law, finance, the medical profession, and the publishing and film industries. Physics has laid the groundwork for many advanced industries; including computers, telecommunications, lasers, and medical diagnostics. Physicists investigate many of the latest discoveries such as massive neutrinos, blue semiconductor lasers, high temperature superconductors, black holes, and our expanding universe. Physics is the fundamental science of the properties and interactions of matter and energy. Physics students study a great deal of mathematics in order to understand nature in mathematical terms. They obtain laboratory skills, design experiments and apply instrumentation, such as, electronics circuits and optical instruments, to observe and measure natural phenomena.

Statistics

Statistics is an interesting, applied area of mathematics. It is the extraction of information from mathematical data. Actuarial science is an offshoot of statistics. Actuarial science deals with statistical relations as they pertain to pensions, life insurance policies, car insurance, employment insurance, and the like. In the fields of statistics and actuarial sciences, individuals extract reliable data from complex databases. Statistical analysis is evolving constantly. Statistical and actuarial sciences focus on the extraction and interpretation of data in complex systems.

Wildlife Studies

It’s the study of wildlife animal species, their habitats and biodiversity and their conservation and protection as well.

Zoology

Zoology is the study of animals. Zoologists study everything from the single cell to the entire organism and population of any given animal, they also take into consideration the larger environmental conditions in which animals live. From the desert to the rain forest and ocean, zoologists study the interplay between life elements. Some zoologists are interested in the biology of particular groups of animals. Others are concerned with the structure and function of animal bodies. Still others study how new animals are formed and how their characteristics are passed on from one generation to another. Zoologists study also the interactions of animals with one another and their environments, and the significance of the behavior of animals.